You Are My Spring -- Episodes 9 & 10: With Happiness Comes Sadness

It's abundantly clear from how the story unfolds that childhood traumatic experiences leave strong emotions and physical reactions that can persist long after the event from how Da Jung, Young Do, and Ian Chase's physiological responses, one can feel the fear and the helplessness embedded in their memories still as they struggle even as adults to deal with them.

Aside from the beautiful way Kang Da Jung and Ju Young Do conversate, and their electrifying passion for each other, the stories in Ji Seung Hyun (Young Do's best friend) and especially Ga Young's trainer Han Jin Ho, Patrick and Ga Young, Da Jung's brother, the twins, give me the most joy. I enjoy them all, but the one that blows me away every time he is on screen is Yoon Park in how much he's perfected his duality in Chae Jun and Ian Chase and how deeply his sorrow grips at him. It's like everyone is a puzzle piece slowly coming together in this extraordinary story.

Da Jung and Young Do's awkwardness after their intimate moment was hilarious, and what was even better was their teenage-like love so pure and eager. Poor Young Do never a moment to himself even when he's trying to date. When I saw Kim Nam Hee (I love him to pieces) would have a cameo role in this drama, I was excited to see what it would be. I didn't expect him to be an actor in Ga Young's Princess Forever drama (Rooftop Prince anyone); Young Do and his friends had me smiling the whole time.

I want to say I only love Nam Gyu Ri, but the truth of the matter is I love this entire cast to pieces. The camping was so much fun. It makes me wish Ian Chase could've been a part of it too. I adore that this drama tackles childhood trauma and how it shapes the human psychic, but more that it depicts it through the eyes of the seven-year-old selves of Da Jung, Young Do, and even Ian Chase. I am not sure how deep or how high the cover-up with the church or the people involved go, but it sure is becoming quite heavy and scary, and the worst part is that it doesn't just involve Ian Chase but is reeling Da Jung and Young Do in as well. I can see that it's only a matter of time, though, before their happiness brings sadness. I just hope they can overcome it together.

I can understand Da Jung's fear of Ian Chase, especially since he isn't helping his case much. All he wants is to be liked and stop the loneliness, but he doesn't seem to know how and comes off a lot scarier than he means to; it shows he, too, is trying to overcome his traumatic past the best way he knows. I am not sure how deep or how high the cover-up with the church or the people involved go, but it sure is becoming quite heavy and scary, and the worst part is that it may not just involve Ian Chase but maybe reeling Da Jung and Young Do in as well.


This weeks' episodes skillfully expressed how this drama does a fantastic job of balancing the romantic with the violent to the extent that sometimes one completely forgets there is violence until we're suddenly in a scene that reminds us of it. And it seems so out of place, yet it isn't really; it's part of the journey. The comedy and jokes from Ga Young, Han Jin Ho, Young Do, and Da Jung's friends, including the humor that comes from Da Jung and Young Do themselves, are what makes the journey truly special. I've always liked Kim Dong Wook's acting. But this drama has given me a new perspective on how incredibly talented he is as an actor. Watch episodes 9 & 10 here.


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